Hong Kong’s Street Art Scene with Mural Painter Elsa de Jean De Dieu

By LUXE City Guides

French artist Elsa de Jean De Dieu was sidetracked from moving to New York by Hong Kong more than 10 years ago. After a month, she was compelled to stay here. As a trained ‘peintre décorateur’ (special painter), Elsa creates textured interiors for retail, hotels and restaurants, but in recent years she has extended her talents to street art – you’ll spy her painterly, feminine murals adorning walls in Central, Soho and Sai Ying Pun, with one of the most recognisable being the laughing woman outside Uma Nota restaurant on Peel Street. The accomplished muralist talks to us about her love for Hong Kong, and the evolution of street art in her adopted city.

How does Hong Kong influence your work?
How does Hong Kong influence your work?

Hong Kong is reflected in all my work. I started running because of Hong Kong and I’m glad – whenever I’m running I look at the colour of nature and I always bring nature elements to my artwork so it’s very happy, authentic, green, flowery.

How have people responded to your murals?
How have people responded to your murals?

The first mural I did was for Uma Nota (Brazilian-Japanese restaurant on Peel Street). When I was working, I could see people watching me, all smiling and I was so happy. It’s a happy artwork – she’s smiling – and I could tell that the artwork was talking to the people.

I don’t speak Cantonese but I’ve had the most amazing experiences with the old people working on the streets – particularly in my favourite neighbourhood, Sheung Wan, which is a friendly community. They come up to me, smile to me and check my work everyday. Through my artwork we have an amazing connection; we don’t talk the same language, but the universal language is happiness. They recognise me now. As a foreigner painting outside makes me feel part of the community.

How has the street art scene evolved during your time in Hong Kong?
How has the street art scene evolved during your time in Hong Kong?

When I first moved here there was very little street art, it changed about five years ago because of Bibo (restaurant in Sheung Wan), whose French owner brought in artists like Banksy, Vhils, Space Invader and other famous artists who came to Hong Kong to create works for the inside [of Bibo], and they did artworks elsewhere in the city.

Today, street art brings a different kind of tourist; people travel to Hong Kong to just see the street art. Instagram is amazing for us artists, it’s really powerful as people see your work and travel. I think within two years Hong Kong will be different again and will have a stronger identity in terms of art.

What are the cultural highlights for visitors to Hong Kong, where do you recommend they go?
What are the cultural highlights for visitors to Hong Kong, where do you recommend they go?

Tai Kwun is amazing! M+ too... I think it’s good that Hong Kong is changing culturally. And PMQ I think is really good. It was the first time we had something more creative, unique and not so commercial like all the big global brands. The city is going back to its heritage, it’s more cultural, which is good.

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